Occupational Therapists

An occupational therapist is a person who has graduated from an entry-level occupational therapy program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) or predecessor organizations, or approved by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT), or an equivalent international occupational therapy education program; has successfully completed a period of supervised fieldwork experience required by the occupational therapy program; has passed a nationally recognized entry-level examination for occupational therapists, and fulfills state requirements for licensure, certification, or registration. An occupational therapist provides interventions based on evaluation and which emphasize the therapeutic use of everyday life activities (i.e., occupations) with individuals or groups for the purpose of facilitating participation in roles and situations and in home, school, workplace, community and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for the purpose of promoting health and wellness and are provided to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction. Occupational therapists address the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory, and other aspects of occupational performance in a variety of contexts to support engagement in everyday life activities that affect health, well-being, and quality of life. *

Specialization: Low Vision

Occupational therapists enable children and adults with visual impairment to engage in their chosen daily living activities safely and as independently as possible. This is accomplished by 1) teaching the person to use their remaining vision as efficiently as possible to complete activities; (2) modifying activities so that they can be completed with less vision; (3) training the person in use of adaptive equipment to compensate for vision loss, including high and low technology assistive devices; and (4) modifying the person's environment. **




Diane Akula MS OTRL
Mr. Ali Alkhateeb OTR
Vito Amato OTR/L
Bernadette Anderson OTR/L
Susan Aoki
Alyssa Arnold OTR/L
Ms. Bonnie Avis OTR
Patrice Bain MS, OTR/L
Deann Bayerl MS, OTR/L
Cindy Bello
Toni Boom
Ms. Donna Boulanger MS, OTR/L
Kevin Cote
Renee Council OTR/L
Ms. Teresita Cueto OTR/L
Mrs. Konane Deryke OTR
Eileen Droney OTR/L
Mrs. Amy Elliston OTR
Elizabeth Eng OTR/L
Sharon Engelhardt OT/L
Suzanne Fraser COTA/L
Tiffany Gardner OT
Jennifer Gendeman OT
Ms. Kate Gillis
Mary Gower
Ms. Laurene Grenier OTR/L
Mrs. Danielle Harris-Nguyen MA, OTR/L
Deirdre Haynie MS, OTR/L
Mrs. Christina Hedlich OTR/L
Ms. Marianne Hilliard OTR/L
Holly Holyk OTR/L
Mary Jepsen
Mr. Steven Johnson OTR/L
Dareth Law OTR/L
Yu-Hsuan Lee OT
Mrs. Kelly Lewis OTR/L
Kate Lines OTR
Emma Linne
Linda Mangun OTR
Mrs. Jackie Martin OTR/L
Laurie Martinchuk
Cary Martinez MS, OTR/L
Ms. Marci Miller OTR/L
Brittany Minor OT
Regina Navia MS, OTR/L
Ms. Denise Peralta OTR/L
Miss Ryan Peterson OTR/L, CLVT
Annemarie Petty OTR/L
Pamela Poteete OTR/L
Mrs. Michelle Ralph OTR/L
Michelle Reed OTR/L
Robin Richmond OTR
Mrs. Maxine Scheiman OTR/L
Kimberly Schoessow OTD, OTR/L
Mrs. Diane Shirley Morledge Ham OTR/L
Kaitlyn Smith OTD, OTR/L
Courtney Snell OTR/L
Tamara Traber OTR
Mrs. Fay Tripp MS, OTR/L, CDRS
Mrs. Jill Tucker OTR/L
Deborah Vautrin OT/L
Sudha Warrier
Dr. Stephen Whittaker OT, CLVT
Mr. David Willwerth
Margaret Wolf OT/L
Danese Zander OTR
Kimberly Zaniewski OT

* Source: The Guide to Occupational Therapy Practice, 2nd edition. Bethesda: American Occupational Therapy Association, 2007. [7/1/2008: new] Additional Resources: The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) does offer voluntary specialty certification for a Low Vision Occupational Therapist if the applicant meets the following requirements: <ul> <li>Professional or technical degree or equivalent in occupational therapy. <li>Certified or licensed by and in good standing with an AOTA recognized credentialing or regulatory body. <li>Minimum of 2,000 hours of experience as an occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant. <li>600 hours of experience delivering occupational therapy services in the certification area to clients (individuals, groups, or populations) in the last 3 calendar years. Service delivery may be paid or voluntary. <li>Verification of employment. </ul>AOTA Fact Sheets: Low Vision; OT Services for Individuals with Visual Impairments

** Source: The Guide to Occupational Therapy Practice, 2nd edition. Bethesda: American Occupational Therapy Association, 2007. [7/1/2008: new] Additional Resources: The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) does offer voluntary specialty certification for a Low Vision Occupational Therapist if the applicant meets the following requirements: <ul> <li>Professional or technical degree or equivalent in occupational therapy. <li>Certified or licensed by and in good standing with an AOTA recognized credentialing or regulatory body. <li>Minimum of 2,000 hours of experience as an occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant. <li>600 hours of experience delivering occupational therapy services in the certification area to clients (individuals, groups, or populations) in the last 3 calendar years. Service delivery may be paid or voluntary. <li>Verification of employment. </ul>AOTA Fact Sheets: Low Vision; OT Services for Individuals with Visual Impairments